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Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Frazzled


It's just not letting up. And this morning someone got pissy with me because I can't fit in a couple of interviews for a managerial position in his department, until next week. I snarked back that if I manage to grow an extra head and pair of hands by tomorrow, I'll be more than happy to comply with his request.

I'm definitely feeling overly 'crisp' around the edges.

Oh great, now I want a bacon butty with HP sauce.


22 comments:

D said...

Fiona coming right up - one bacon sarnie and sauce - lovely breakfast. Just hope the situation hasn't taken your rind off too. Keep on truckin girl DLTBGYD

Who Me? said...

Yum, Yum Pig's Bum! (literally :)

Don't you just hate that when people have unrealistic expectations of you?

Ask him if he'd like you to stick a feather duster up your bum and do the dusting while you're at it! Better still, tell him to do that :)

Jac said...

My favorite saying: "This to shall pass." Works in good times and in bad! We'll get through it all. And look at the rainbow waiting for you on the other side of this month! Hugs of support

deb said...

Thanks, now you've got me craving bacon.

freebird said...

Slurp... don't show me bacon sarnies when I'm hungry! Especially with HP... (drool)....
Yeah, just think of November, it'll soon be here.

~Tim said...

Looks good enough to eat!

...the sandwich, that is. What did you think I meant?

LePhare said...

Nothing better than a bacon butty. Makes all the pain go away......

S* said...

I love me some bacon!

But what is butty?

Jamie said...

Awww, a little tomato and that thing would be perfect!

D said...

S A butty or buttie depending on where in Britain you come from is usually a large sandwich made with thick bread and usually associated with the working classes.

Who Me? said...

I was married to a pom who used to love his 'chip butty' (that's the french fry type chip)...

I always thought the 'butty' referred to the butter that was put on the sandwich - like loads of butter!

And it's pronounced bootty (not the shake your bootie way, but the cockney way ;)

George said...

Tell them all to piss off and take a number ... don't suppose you could do that, eh?

freebird said...

Sorry Who Me?, but a cockney would never say 'bootty' for butty. If you were married to someone who said 'bootty' and told you he was a cockney, he was telling porkies!

Who Me? said...

hehe freebird, telling porkies!

He was from 'artlepool, so that wouldn't make him a cockney would it? I show my lack of knowledge on the dialect subject :)

LePhare said...

Surprising what problems a bacon butty (butee... cockney pronunciation) can cause!

Who Me? said...

Oh well - we all learnt something lephare ;)

So tell me - would a Hartlepudlian pronounce it bootty as part of their usual dialect? Or was my ex-husband full of it? (Actually I already know he was full of it, that's why he's my ex ;)

freebird said...

Oh yes, Hartlepool is definitely far enough north to say 'bootty' (the double o being short, as in look, not as in food, just to be really pedantic here!)

And for anyone still scratching their head, 'porkies' is cockney rhyming slang for lies. (Pork pies, see?)

And just for the record, I'm no more a cockney than WM's ex, just into accents!

LePhare said...

I go with Freebird. I married an Essex girl (no jokes please about white shoes or handbags) but her father was an East Ender...... cor blimee!

Who Me? said...

hehe....thanks freebird and lephare for clarifying that :)

Yep, knew about the rhyming slang porkie pies thing, and thought you were very clever to bring it into play on a post about bacon!

Fiona - I bet you had no idea your frazzled post would lead to so many comments and information sharing.

The part of blogging I enjoy the most :)

Sunny Delight said...

I hope things are going better for you.

Fiona said...

Whoever would have thought the simple bacon butty/sarnie/sammich would have caused such excitement :) And thank you all for your concern.

I guess my working-class roots were showing. And proud of them I am. My dad was from Leith and then Oxgangs in Edinburgh. While Leith is now a des-res (desirable residence), Oxgangs was and will always be a bit of a rough area. My mum, on the other hand was solidly middle-class.

Accents and dialects are so fascinating. And while people in England, Wales and Scotland will tell you that they're speaking English, it can be a very, very long way from standard everyday English!

I wonder what conversation my Eccles Cakes will trigger ;)

Sunny...within 48 hours...I promise an email!!!

D said...

Eccles cake - or dead fly cake as it was known in my household - lovely all the same Eee bah gum !!!

 

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